Feb 23

Inspector Pumphead’s FAQs: What Does Dual Voltage Mean for My Pump?

Welcome to Inspector Pumphead’s Frequently Asked Questions! I will be answering some of the most common questions we get on a specific topic. Some of this information may also be available elsewhere, but this feature will serve as a convenient one-stop source. Today, I’ll be giving a simple explanation of what dual voltage ratings mean for your pump.

The Inspector is in and ready to answer your questions!

Why do some of your pumps listed say 208-230 volts or 208-230/460? 

You may see this listing on any number of our pumps, such as in the Liberty grinder pump ProVore/Omnivore series.

This type of listing shows that the pump’s AC motor is rated for dual voltage service, meaning that the pump can be safely run at any of the listed voltages. So if your pump motor plate says 208-230, you know that your pump must run within the range of those two voltages. Note that while the pump will be able to run on either voltage, the amperage draw will differ depending on which voltage you choose. Tri voltage (208-230/460) motors are also available for some pumps.

Single voltage motors must be run at the specified voltage listing, but there is room for a little leeway – about 10% more or less than the listed voltage. This is called the service factor and allows for minor fluctuations in your power level due to various outside factors.

Keep in mind that single phase motors can be either 115 or 230 volt, while three phase motors can be 208, 230, 460 volt or higher. Also note that 208-230 and 208/230 denote the same thing. Different manufacturers use different notation and PumpProducts.com abides by the manufacturer’s description.

This is a general overview of what you should look for when purchasing a pump on our site. Motors and electricity can get tricky, so as always, be sure to consult a certified electrician for any of your pressing motor issues or questions.

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Feb 19

Know Your Pump Repair Parts: Flanges


Know Your Repair Parts: Flanges

Nothing in life lasts forever. Luckily Pump Products sells a variety of repair parts and accessories guaranteed to restore life to your pump or system.

Bell & Gossett P03250

Today’s topic: flanges.

What are flanges?

Flanges are used to connect pipes to pumps, valves, and other components. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes to specifically suit different applications. Flanges can be made of such materials as bronze, cast-iron, stainless steel, and brass.

Below you will find a brief description of some of the more common types of flanges.

Types of flanges

Slip On Flange

Slip on flanges are slipped over a pipe and fillet welded from both the inside and the outside to strengthen the connection. These flanges are suitable for low temperature and pressure applications. Slip on flanges come at a low cost and require less accuracy when cutting a pipe to length.

Threaded Flanges

Threaded flanges are fast and simple to attach. Threaded flanges are similar to slip on flanges however the bore is threaded which allows for assembly without welding. This type of flange is not suitable for high pressure and high temperature applications.

Lap Joint Flange

Lap joint flanges are divided into two parts, a stub end and loose backing flange. The stub end is butt welded to a pipe and the backing flange can move freely over the pipe. Lap joint flanges are used in applications where space is minimal and intermittent dismantling is necessary for fixes and inspection.

Welding Neck Flange

Welding neck flanges are designed to be joined to a piping system by butt welding. They tend to be more expensive but are suited for high pressure applications as they feature the greatest joint integrity. Pressures are transferred from the flange to the pipe. The inner diameter of the flange matches the piping’s diameter, which also reduces turbulence and erosion.

Socket Weld Flanges

Socket weld flanges are similar to slip on flanges. Pipe is fitted into the female sockets and fillet welded around the hub of the flange. Socket weld flanges are preferable for smaller pipes and high pressure applications. An internal weld can be applied in certain extreme pressure applications.

Blind Flange

Blind flanges do not feature bores and are used to seal an end of a piping system or opening. They are most common when easy access is needed for inspection.

Flanges are an absolute necessity for ensuring the smooth operation of your system. Visit our accessory section to see the multitude of flanges Pump Products carries from the most trusted brands in the industry.

Pump Products sales specialists are standing by to help you find the right pump or part, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Feb 09

Inspector Pumphead’s Quick Tips: Know Your Frost Line

Here’s another minty-fresh edition of everyone’s favorite semi-recurring content feature: Inspector Pumphead’s Quick Tips!

Inspector Pumphead wants you to never run a pump dry.

In this space, I, Inspector Pumphead from Pump Products, will be sending out friendly reminders and dispensing basic tips for ordering, maintaining and servicing pumps. The Inspector is in and here to help!

Quick Tip: Know your frost line before burying a sump basin your backyard

Punxustawney Phil has spoken and sadly we still have some ways to go before winter ends. For those of us in colder climates, that means hats, gloves, warming up your car before you drive and knowing your frost line.

The frost line is simply the maximum depth in which the groundwater in your soil is expected to freeze. From a pumping perspective, this means that the discharge line for your sump pump must be beneath this line. Otherwise, the pipe may freeze, which in turn will damage your pump. In addition, any kind of tank or basin you bury in your backyard will also have to below the frost line.

Luckily, it is not too difficult to determine your frost line – this map from Hammerpedia is a solid general overview of what the line might be in your area. For a more specific reading for your local area, you can usually contact your local plumber to find out the frost line. It’s a simple step that will prevent freezing and damage. Good luck and let’s make it through the rest of this God forsaken winter!

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Feb 07

Inspector Pumphead’s Video Classroom: How Check Valves Work

Welcome back to another exciting edition of Inspector Pumphead’s Video Classroom! In this feature, I, Inspector Pumphead, will tackle a common question about pumps, parts or water systems using fun visual aids. This video is designed for those who like visual learning or enjoy a bit of fun in the classroom!

In today’s feature, Pump Products sales specialist Nick is talking about check valves! He will explain what check valves are, why your pump needs a check valve and a little bit about the variety of check valves that you can use for a given pumping application.

What is a Check Valve?

A check valve is simply a valve that is installed on a discharge pipe leading away from pump and that acts as a backflow preventer to stop any discharged water from travelling back the way it came. This is important because water that flows back into the pit or basin containing the pump will activate the pump, causing it to cycle more frequently than is necessary for the system. Eventually, this will cause the pump to burn out and break down.

How It Works

The two main types that Nick talks about are a spring controlled check valve and the more common “flapper” check valves. Spring controlled valves use water pressure to move a spring, which opens the valve before closing. They are well-suited for use in pressure boosting applications and often use a threaded connection.

Most check valves you encounter will be flapper-style valves, often in standard sump or sewage applications. Such check valves will have a thin, lightweight plastic door that opens in a flapping motion away from the pump (in the direction of the flowing water). Once the water stops flowing, the door shuts and prevents backflow. Different types of connections can be used. For instance, the Liberty CV150 uses flexible Fernco rubber connections, while others use PVC solvent.

The Zoeller 30-0040 is a “quiet check” valve that reduces noise and the risk of water hammer. The Liberty BCV150 is a combination ball and check valve with a union connection. The check valve prevents backflow, while the ball valve functions as an isolation valve. The structure allows for easy disassembly without disturbing the piping.

The check valves used in the video are ultimately a sample of the many varieties you can find and use for your pumping application. If you do not see the check valve you want or need listed here, be sure to contact us and we can get it for your system.

Pump Products sales specialists are standing by to help you find the right pump or part, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Jan 26

Inspector Pumphead’s Quick Tips: Do Not Dry Run a Centrifugal Pump

Here’s another minty-fresh edition of everyone’s favorite semi-recurring content feature: Inspector Pumphead’s Quick Tips!

Inspector Pumphead wants you to never run a pump dry.

In this space, I, Inspector Pumphead from Pump Products, will be sending out friendly reminders and dispensing basic tips for ordering, maintaining and servicing pumps. The Inspector is in and here to help!

Quick Tip: Dry running a centrifugal pump can cause damage to your pump and system.

A centrifugal pump uses the kinetic energy generated by the rotation of the impeller to transport water. Keep in mind that most of the pumps we sell are centrifugal pumps. The liquid that the pump transports is key to counteracting the heat generated by the impeller’s motion and keeping both the pump body and motor cool.

When and if the pump is run dry, there is no water to counter and slow the motion of the impeller. Speed increases past the desired point and the heat generated increases as well. This could cause sparking, overheating, melted plastic and a busted pump that needs immediate replacement. We’ve heard plenty of horror stories of warped pumps that were run dry for one reason or another. So make sure to periodically check your pump and make sure that the water is flowing smoothly and consistently to your pump.

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Jan 11

Inspector Pumphead’s Classroom: Training with Alderon Industries


Pump Products staff members recently attended a technical training session with the national sales director of Alderon Industries, one of the company’s newest manufacturing partners. Alderon specializes in making high quality control panels, floats and alarms.This session was part of a continuing effort by the team to better educate themselves on the products we carry and in turn help customers choose the best products for each one’s need and budget.

Ben Moy of Alderon conducted the illuminating training session using a PowerPoint presentation and several display control panels as physical examples. He started by laying out the history of Alderon Industries.

Breakdown of a panel

Initially founded by one of the lead engineers of SJE Rhombus (then SJE Electric) control panels, Alderon’s purpose was to create a new generation of control panels. One of the original Alderon designs introduced a rubber gasket in the lining of the panel door to keep out rain. The inspiration for the company’s name indeed comes from the planet from “Star Wars”; the two cofounders were watching the classic sci-fi film while brainstorming potential names (though as any geek can tell you, the planet is spelled Alderaan in the movie).

Some Alderon panels and floats

Moy walked the Pump Products crew through the basics of the popular “Check It” series of control panels. Perhaps the defining feature of this panel series is the ease of connecting the pump and floats to the right terminals due to careful labeling. Moy noted that with other panels, confusion can often reign.

“In a lot of states, the only person who can set up a panel is a certified electrician. So a municipality will order the panel and have it sit for days, weeks even,” he said. “By the time the electrician comes, they’ve thrown away the instructions and no one knows what goes where.”

Application engineer Nick taking detailed notes

All Check-It panels carry labels on the cords for the pump itself, the “off” float, the lead float and the alarm float (if applicable) to connect to the correct terminals. Moy also demonstrated how the circuit board is hardwired into the terminal and into the HOA (Hands Off Automatic) switch. Additional features in the panel include a pump run indicator, float switch indicators and alarm power indicators. Moy also demonstrated how a jump wire within the panel gives an alarm notification for manual reset. The jump wire can also be removed for automatic reset.

A Check It panel

The Pump Products team was also given a sneak preview of some exciting new Alderon products that could be due for release in March. Be sure to check back in this space for more information on them.

“This was a really great technical training session in the sense that we were given a good demonstration of how the products look and how they operate,” according to Pump Products application engineer Lee. “Seeing the detail in how the panel works will definitely help us in giving advice to customers.”

The circuit board within the panel

Pump Products is continuing to add more sessions to better understand manufacturer products. Be sure to take a look at the Alderon controls that we carry and call if you have any questions.

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Dec 18

Inspector Pumphead’s Video Classroom: How To Read a Pump Curve Chart


Welcome back to another exciting edition of Inspector Pumphead’s Video Classroom! In this feature, I, Inspector Pumphead, will tackle a common question about pumps, parts or water systems using fun visual aids. This video is designed for those who like visual learning or enjoy a bit of fun in the classroom!

In today’s feature, my assistant Mike, will explain how to read a pump curve chart. The pump curve is something you should be able to find in the corresponding literature for any pump we sell. It is simply a visual representation of the pump’s performance. The graph may be confusing or intimidating to those who don’t consider themselves technically savvy, but fear not! This isn’t a replay of calculus; curves are actually pretty simple to read.

The above video will discuss the most basic type of curve which identifies pump performance through two variables: flow rate (or capacity) and total dynamic head. Those are the two basic things you need to know to identify what pump goes with your system. In the above example, Mike uses a curve from a Goulds WW05 3872 sewage pump.

For those of you that like a written guide to go with your videos, read on below for a repost of a previous blog about pump curves. It goes into a little more detail and talks about more advanced curves as well. A Pumphead Classic all right!


A common question that customers ask Pump Products application engineers is, “What am I looking at?” in reference to the pump curve charts you can often find in technical manuals and brochures.

The pump curve is simply a visual representation of the conditions in which the pump ca

Goulds WE0311L

Goulds WE0311L

n operate. At the most basic level the relationship between flow (plotted on the x-axis) and head (y-axis) is displayed. Thus, if you know the total dynamic head capability of the pump, you can easily determine how many gallons per minute the pump can move.

Knowing how to read a pump curve chart can help you pick the most efficient pump for your application, keep that pump running in optimal condition, and ensure a long operating life. If you need to replace a pump, the information can also help estimate flow rates for an existing system.

Put simply, understanding the information on a pump curve chart can save you time, money, and a lot of maintenance effort in the long run.

In this blog post, we will walk you through reading a basic flow-head curve and give a primer on reading more intermediate and advanced curves as well.

Continue reading

Nov 20

Inspector Pumphead’s Classroom: Training with See Water, Inc.

As part of an ongoing effort to provide the best possible service for all product lines, Pump Products employees attended a training session with a representative from See Water Inc.  See Water, located in Riverside, CA, is one of Pump Products’ newest manufacturing partners and is renowned in the industry for its line of innovative water products and controls.

Pump Products currently carries a plethora of quality wastewater pump control accessories from See Water, including water level alarms, control panels and junction boxes.

Eric Wallace, Vice President of Operations at See Water, gave a presentation lecture in which he dove into the history of the company, its products, and practices for ensuring across the board customer satisfaction.

Training day begins

“We’re a customer-driven company and we pride ourselves on great customer service,” he said. “Our focus is always on the end user.”

Wallace said that this focus is best exemplified by the simplicity and straightforwardness of See Water installations. He described his ideal customer interaction as, one in which the customer is able to install the product so easily that he feels compelled to call the company to make sure the process really is that simple. That’s why many See Water products are “plug and play” an approach that emphasizes the end user in the consumer interaction chain.  This produces return customers, and according to Wallace, there’s nothing See Water likes more than return customers. It is a philosophy that Pump Products shares as well.

An attentive class

Another, incredible fact is that, all See Water products are constructed at the company facility in Riverside, CA. Having everything manufactured in the U.S., is an important mark of quality. All products are also UL-listed and CSA certified for the U.S. and Canada.

Such customer care also extends to the warranty process. Most See Water products (except custom builds) include a 3-year warranty. Wallace estimates that “90%” of warranty issues are able to be resolved through calling the company directly and troubleshooting. This allows the user or contractor to solve the problem onsite. In cases where that doesn’t work out, customers can send the product back to See Water for thorough examination.

“We’re just interested in the customer being happy,” he said.

Eric listens to questions

Testing is also an important aspect of the process. Each product that leaves the warehouse is factory tested before it is packaged. Wallace emphasized that the testing is not a la carte but holistic.

“We don’t have a station with a bunch of floats and then hook up a panel to test it,” he said. “We test each control panel with the specific float that will be in the package before it gets sent out. That way the customer is sure to get everything that works.”

For lead times, prebuilt products can usually be sent to Pump Products within a matter of days. Custom panels can take up to four weeks but See Water tries to push those panels through sooner if possible, particularly for repeat customers.

An example of some of the material

See Water also emphasizes the commonality of various parts and components across various types of panels. This allows the engineers to rig up all sorts of custom panels, with special custom features, tailored to make the user’s life much easier. Some of these features include but are not limited to: touchscreen interfaces, variable frequency drives, programmable logic controllers, multiple alarms (that can be run back to a main alarm) and solar alarms.

The thoroughness of the engineering process allows for a lot of same-day and next day quotes on custom panels. Making sure exactly what each customer needs, also reduces the risk of returns and call-backs.

The fabled See Water price catalog

“It was a really interesting and informative lecture,” Pump Products application engineer Nick said. “It’s always good to get insight into how other companies interact with customers and think about how we can apply those practices here [at Pump Products].”

The training session with See Water is part of a continual effort by the Pump Products staff to familiarize themselves with manufacturer products, to deliver the best possible service and product information to our customers.

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Nov 10

Inspector Pumphead’s Classroom: How to Replace a Pump Bearing Assembly

Welcome to another exciting edition of Inspector Pumphead’s Classroom! In this feature, we’ll be talking about various small, simple pump “How-To’s” that any homeowner, small business owner or facilities manager can tackle.

The purpose of this feature is to help customers become more familiar with the parts of a pump and give them the confidence to make the necessary fixes to keep the system running smoothly.

In this edition, Pump Products application engineer Nick, will walk you through the process of replacing a bearing assembly on a three-piece circulator pump from Bell & Gossett. The bearing assembly is the unit between the motor and the volute/pump casing. It contains the connecting shaft that powers the impeller, allowing the pump to move fluid.

From left to right: Motor, volute and bearing assembly with impeller

A good indicator that the bearing assembly needs a replacement, is if you hear strange noises coming from that area on the pump. If a seal or coupler snaps, you might hear a squeaking or shaking noise. You might also see traces of oil or water leakage in the pump area. Since the bearing is what keeps both ends of the pump functioning together, it is important to replace one right away if defective.

Pump Products expert Nick walks you through the replacement process in the video below:

The pump used for the breakdown is the Bell & Gossett 102210 HV NFI, a top flight circulator. The bearing assembly replacement package is the B&G 189166LF , which includes the attached impeller, a replacement gasket and lubricant.

*Note: While B&G repair parts are used in the example for this video, Pump Products also carries Taco pump repair parts, Grundfos pump repair parts, Armstrong pump repair parts and Wilo pump repair parts, among others.

Tools and supplies

–1 ⅝” combination wrench

–1 7/16″ combination wrench

–1 Allen wrench/hex key

–Lubricant (should come in the replacement package)

–Replacement bearing assembly

–Alcohol wipes

Process

As always when working on a pump, be sure to turn off the motor and shut down the water flow moving through the pump. For this process you will not have to remove the pump end from the piping.

Loosen the bolts on the motor end first

Identify the bearing assembly of the pump. It should be between the wet end and the motor of the pump.

First you will detach the motor end from the bearing assembly. For this attachment you will use the box end of the 7/16″ wrench.

Use the wrench to carefully loosen the bolts.

Pull the bearing assembly away from the motor, and inside you will find a spring-style coupler which connects the two units. This is where you will use your Allen key.

The motor disconnected from the rest of the pump

On each end of the coupler will be an indentation where it connects to the shaft. Use your Allen key to loosen the connections and remove the coupler.

Take out the coupler and put it and the motor down somewhere safe. Unless you bought a replacement, you will need to reattach the existing coupler.

Next, turn your attention to the other end of the bearing assembly, which is also connected by four bolts to the volute.

For this part you will use the box end of your ⅝” combination wrench to loosen and remove the bolts.

Loosening the bolts on the pump end

You can now remove the old bearing assembly. Inside the lip of the volute should be a rubber gasket. Remove the gasket and examine the lip area for any impurities or imperfections. This area is important for creating a watertight seal, so be sure to wipe it down with alcohol wipes or a similar cleaning agent until the area is clean.

The removed bearing assembly with attached impeller

Now you can install your replacement bearing assembly. This will simply be the deconstruction process in reverse. Insert the end with the impeller into the volute, reapply the bolts and tighten in a criss cross pattern to ensure a watertight seal.

Next, you will to have reattach the spring coupler. Remove the the piece of cardboard from the impeller shaft in the bearing assembly and find the right indentation groove. Match up the groove on the coupler and shaft, insert the hex key until it is flush to the area and tighten.

You will need to reattach the coupler

You will need to repeat the coupler process with the shaft end of the motor unit.

Once the coupler is secure, you can reattach the motor end completely and tighten the bolts.  Since there is no watertight seal between the motor and bearing assembly, you do not necessarily have to use the criss cross pattern.

You can see the coupler peeking out from the bearing assembly

Since the pump used in this example is not maintenance free, you will have to apply some lubrication (a bottle should be included with your package). Find the insert cap above the bearing assembly, fill with oil until the bottle is empty or oil starts to accrue at the top of the cap. Close the cap and you are ready to turn the pump and water flow back on.

So that’s it! It’s a relatively simple process. As always, be sure to examine your pump regularly and practice preventative maintenance.

If you have any ideas for other ‘How-To’ guides you’d like to see, let us know in the comments.

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.

Nov 02

Inspector Pumphead’s Classroom: How To Change a Circulator Pump Cartridge

Taco 007 with a replacement catridge

Welcome to another exciting edition of Inspector Pumphead’s Classroom! In this feature, we’ll be talking about various small, simple pump “How-To’s” that any homeowner or facilities manager can tackle.

Next up: How to Replace the Cartridge on a Taco 007 Circulator Pump.

As the name suggests, circulator pumps are used to keep hot water circulating throughout your water system so that it is immediately available at point of use. For those of us who live in colder climates, the coming winter months are a particularly annoying time to have to wait for water at the sink or tub to heat up. The presence of a circulator pump ensures that hot water is always readily available.

The Taco 007 is built for quiet operation in hydronic heating, radiant heating, hydro-air fan coils, indirect water heaters, chilled fresh water and domestic water circulating systems. The cartridge style design means the actual circulating mechanism is contained in an easily serviceable or replaceable single unit. It is perhaps the most popular cirulator on the market and plenty are always available in stock.

In the video below, Pump Products application engineer Nick, who I have personally trained, will walk you through the process of replacing the cartridge, using the Taco 007-F5 pump and the proper Taco replacement cartridge (the cartridge package should also include a replacement gasket and spare bolts as well).

You can also purchase the full suit of Taco Repair parts.

You can also continue reading below for a written breakdown.

Items and Materials

The only tool you’ll need is a hexagonal Allen key (or Allen wrench). Make sure you have the replacement cartridge handy as well.

Steps

–Turn off the water flowing through your system. You do not need to remove the pump base outlets from the piping.

–Identify the four casing bolts.

–One by one, use the proper Allen key to loosen the bolts.

–Remove the bolts.

–Remove the motor casing from the volute. Inside the motor casing you will see the cartridge.

The cartridge removed from the motor casing

–The cartridge should be solidly in place. Tug gently but firmly until the cartridge is out of the casing.

–Discard used cartridge.

–Take the replacement cartridge and firmly insert into the volute.

The cartridge should fit snugly

–Firmly place the replacement rubber gasket into the lip of the volute base. The gasket is important for creating a seal.

The rubber gasket creates a seal

–Line up the base plate and the volute to the base and connect them. Be sure to match up the bolt holes.

Make sure all holes line up

–Insert the bolts and tighten only until each is roughly equally snug. Uneven tightening could cause leaks in one area.

–Complete the tightening on all four bolts in a crisscross pattern to ensure evenness on all sides.

And there you have it. It’s a simple and cheap process, one that any person should reasonably be able to complete. With winter upon us, making sure your circulator pump and cartridge are up to the task at hand is very important.

Do you have any suggestions for other “How To” videos you’d like to see? Let us know in the comments!

Pump Products application engineers are standing by to help you find the right pump, as well as to provide price quotes, stocking availability and shipping information. Call our toll free number 1-800-429-0800 to speak to an expert today.